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Nocturnes ou les garçons perdus
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  • Detail

  • Nocturnals or The Lost Boys

    Set of 18 photographs

    Sizes and Techniques:

    Large size: H 32 X L 32 inches
    Giclée Hahnemühle 308g Fine Art Prints mounted on museum aluminum Dibond (cold mount adhesive process). Wooden painted frames and glass H 35 X L 35 inches. Limited edition of 5.

    Small size: H 18 X L 18 inches
    Giclée Hahnemühle 308g Fine Art Prints mounted on museum aluminum Dibond (cold mount adhesive process). Wooden painted frames and glass H 19 X 19 inches. Limited edition of 5.

    Portfolio H 12 X L 16 inches: 18 Giclée Hahnemühle 308g Fine Art Prints 8 X 8 inches on H 12 X L 16 inches paper, archival box. Limited edition of 8.

    Child book: Nocturnes ou les garçons perdus, published by Où sont les enfants ? Arles, 2009.

    Nocturnals or The lost boys invites us into children's fantasies, in the world of fairy tales with many references, including Peter Pan by James Matthew Barrie, Le Petit Poucet by Charles Perrault, and The Thousand and One Nights. Each image is a fairy tale scene and the whole series can be read as a journey of initiation in three parts, from the city to the wild, always in a nocturnal atmosphere. Indeed, the blue of the image shows an unreal night. With its light and its tint, it transforms landscapes into theatrical sets. A blue, that also responds to that of water, a recurrent element of the series. And, if the words Royal blue and Cobalt blue exist, one should certainly invent a Dream blue for this photographic work.

    Behind this blue, a small boy, wearing pyjamas, keeps close to him his "comfort blanket". He is accompanied by an older child. This other boy seems to wait for him, to protect him, or to bring him along. He remains often in the shadow, with his back to us or with a hood over his head. Sometimes, he is out of the picture, leaving the youngest child alone. In Nocturnals or The lost boys, the concept of “out of frame” is as important as the image itself: Where is the one that doesn't appear? What does the little hero try to reach on the fence? Against whom is the boy pointing his stick? What is down the street? So many questions lead us to the part of the spectator, to the role that spectators occupy or that would like to occupy, in these fairy tales scenes.

    Mireille Loup speaks of our forgotten childhood. We will rediscover our fears, our fascinations or fear of water, our fears mixed with excitement of night time, our certainty about the existence of enchanted caves, of flying carpets, of inhabited forests, of buried treasures. During a moment, the artist makes us believe that imaginary worlds exist. And for us all, at least one image amongst those proposed, will bring back a memory of our childhood, like the madeleine of Marcel Proust.

    Nocturnals or The Lost Boys has been produced by the Biennale internationale de la photographie et des arts visuels (Liège, Belgium), Centre de Photographie (Lectoure, France) and Centre Photographique d'Ile-de-France.

     

    Nocturnes ou les garçons perdus
    Read the text | Back to gallery

    Untitled # 1
    Untitled # 1
    Untitled # 2
    Untitled # 2
    Untitled # 3
    Untitled # 3
    Untitled # 4
    Untitled # 4
    Untitled # 5
    Untitled # 5
    Untitled # 6
    Untitled # 6
    Untitled # 7
    Untitled # 7
    Untitled # 8
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    Untitled # 9
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    Untitled # 10
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    Untitled # 11
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    Untitled # 12
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    Untitled # 13
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    Detail
    Detail

    Nocturnals or The Lost Boys

    Set of 18 photographs

    Sizes and Techniques:

    Large size: H 32 X L 32 inches
    Giclée Hahnemühle 308g Fine Art Prints mounted on museum aluminum Dibond (cold mount adhesive process). Wooden painted frames and glass H 35 X L 35 inches. Limited edition of 5.

    Small size: H 18 X L 18 inches
    Giclée Hahnemühle 308g Fine Art Prints mounted on museum aluminum Dibond (cold mount adhesive process). Wooden painted frames and glass H 19 X 19 inches. Limited edition of 5.

    Portfolio H 12 X L 16 inches: 18 Giclée Hahnemühle 308g Fine Art Prints 8 X 8 inches on H 12 X L 16 inches paper, archival box. Limited edition of 8.

    Child book: Nocturnes ou les garçons perdus, published by Où sont les enfants ? Arles, 2009.

    Nocturnals or The lost boys invites us into children's fantasies, in the world of fairy tales with many references, including Peter Pan by James Matthew Barrie, Le Petit Poucet by Charles Perrault, and The Thousand and One Nights. Each image is a fairy tale scene and the whole series can be read as a journey of initiation in three parts, from the city to the wild, always in a nocturnal atmosphere. Indeed, the blue of the image shows an unreal night. With its light and its tint, it transforms landscapes into theatrical sets. A blue, that also responds to that of water, a recurrent element of the series. And, if the words Royal blue and Cobalt blue exist, one should certainly invent a Dream blue for this photographic work.

    Behind this blue, a small boy, wearing pyjamas, keeps close to him his "comfort blanket". He is accompanied by an older child. This other boy seems to wait for him, to protect him, or to bring him along. He remains often in the shadow, with his back to us or with a hood over his head. Sometimes, he is out of the picture, leaving the youngest child alone. In Nocturnals or The lost boys, the concept of “out of frame” is as important as the image itself: Where is the one that doesn't appear? What does the little hero try to reach on the fence? Against whom is the boy pointing his stick? What is down the street? So many questions lead us to the part of the spectator, to the role that spectators occupy or that would like to occupy, in these fairy tales scenes.

    Mireille Loup speaks of our forgotten childhood. We will rediscover our fears, our fascinations or fear of water, our fears mixed with excitement of night time, our certainty about the existence of enchanted caves, of flying carpets, of inhabited forests, of buried treasures. During a moment, the artist makes us believe that imaginary worlds exist. And for us all, at least one image amongst those proposed, will bring back a memory of our childhood, like the madeleine of Marcel Proust.

    Nocturnals or The Lost Boys has been produced by the Biennale internationale de la photographie et des arts visuels (Liège, Belgium), Centre de Photographie (Lectoure, France) and Centre Photographique d'Ile-de-France.